Posted on

7 Meditations for Visiting a Memorial Stone

Comforting Hands

A memorial stone creates a beautiful marker for non-traditional memorials like ash scatterings. They’re often complementary to the location — with only a simple message to mark the individual’s scattering site. Visiting these stones becomes a blessing for the family and friends of the person who has passed. In fact, we often see this when people visit our garden on our days of celebration. Our scattering garden contains many of these markers, which help people find the right spot in the scatter garden, or to identify their loved one’s memory tree. 

Table of Contents

What is a Memorial Stone?
Why do you visit a Memorial Stone?
What to do when you visit a Memorial Stone?
Meditations for Visiting Memorial Stones

Once our guests locate the personalized memorial stones, they spend some time at that special spot. Most people use that visit to meditate on the life and memories of their loved one; it’s a truly personal and beautiful moment. If you’re considering ash scattering as an option for your loved one, or your own end-of-life planning, the following information can help you during your future visits.

What is a Memorial Stone?

A memorial stone is a simple marker placed at an ash-scattering location. It helps family and friends find the scattering location. At our property, we place memorial stones in our scatter garden or at the base of a memorial tree — depending on the scattering option chosen.

Why do you visit a Memorial Stone?

Visiting a memorial stone is similar to going to a gravesite. It’s a chance to connect with the memory of a loved one and honor their life. Our property is private to ensure the preservation of its natural beauty. However, twice a year we invite visitors to come and see their loved one’s memorial stones.

What to do when you visit a Memorial Stone?

Sometimes, people aren’t sure what to do when they visit a memorial stone. We encourage our guests to take as long as they need at the maker. During this time, people choose their own way to remember and reflect.

  • Say a Prayer: Saying a prayer at a loved one’s scattering site can help you connect your grief to your faith. It can be an expression of hope, pain, or thankfulness for the time you had together.
  • Read a Poem or Verse: Before you visit, you can copy a quote that you want to read at your loved one’s memorial stone. Many people choose a familiar poem or favorite bible verse.
  • Quietly Reflect: Others choose to simply reflect quietly on their loved one’s legacy. In a world with constant noise and distractions, our peaceful mountain top offers a break from busy life.

7 Meditations for Visiting Memorial Stones

We’ve compiled some of our favorite verses to inspire your meditations when you visit your loved one’s scattering site. 

John 11:25-26

Who ever lives by believing in me will never die  - RestAshured.com

“Jesus said to her, ‘I am the resurrection and the life. The one who believes in me will live, even though they die; and whoever lives by believing in me will never die. Do you believe this?’”

As you reflect on this passage, reflect on the promise of eternal life. 

Revelation 21:4

He will wipe every tear from their eyes...  - RestAshured.com

“‘He will wipe every tear from their eyes. There will be no more death, or mourning or crying or pain, for the old order of things has passed away.”

Although you may be grieving now, one day the tears will be replaced with joy. 

Romans 14:8

...whether we live of die, we belong to the Lord. From Romans 14:8  - RestAshured.com

“If we live, we live for the Lord; and if we die, we die for the Lord. So, whether we live or die, we belong to the Lord.”

For believers, we can rest in the knowledge that we belong to the Lord.

Romans 8:38-39

nothing can sperate us from God's love! From Romans 8:38-39  - RestAshured.com

“For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord.”

When you visit your loved one’s memorial stone, this passage will remind you that the love of God is always with us.

Psalm 116:15

Precious in the sigh of the Lord is the death of his faithful servants. From Psalm 116:15  - RestAshured.com

“Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of his faithful servants.”

Find comfort in knowing that the Lord cares about your loved one’s death as much as you do.

John 3:16

...whoever believe in him shall not perish bit have eternal life. From John 3:16  - RestAshured.com

“For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.”

Remember that God sacrificed so that we could all be reunited in heaven someday. 

1 Corinthians 15:53-55

Death has been swallowed up in victory. From 1 Corinthians 15:52 - RestAshured.com

“For the perishable must clothe itself with the imperishable, and the mortal with immortality. When the perishable has been clothed with the imperishable, and the mortal with immortality, then the saying that is written will come true:
“Death has been swallowed up in victory.
Where, O death, is your victory?
Where, O death, is your sting?”

For those who believe in Christ, death is just a passage from life into new life.

Mark Your Loved One’s Final Resting Place

If you’re considering ash scattering as a final goodbye for your loved one, please get in touch with us. We can help you arrange the service and answer your questions. While we can’t ease the burden of your loss, we can provide a beautiful way to say goodbye. 

Call 434-534-4007 or email us at info@restashured.com.

Posted on

Honoring Cremation Ashes Ideas

Holding Hands

Choosing how to put our loved one’s ashes to rest can feel overwhelming. There are many ideas for honoring cremation ashes — from creating jewelry to keeping them in an urn. Many people decide to pick a place to scatter ashes because it creates a place to visit in the future. 

Table of Contents

Scatter Atop a Mountain Garden
Plant a Memorial Tree 
Scatter Ashes at Sea 

Years ago, we were presented with this same situation. We wanted to honor our loved one through scattering. Yet we also wanted a place where we could visit and reflect. It needed to be somewhere special, beautiful, and most importantly, someplace that would be preserved over time. 

Cremation Ashes Ideas

After a memorial service, you can wait any length of time before deciding to scatter your loved one’s ashes. Many people even keep ashes in their homes for years while they mourn. Whenever you’re ready, scattering the ashes allows you a final moment of closure and a place to visit for reflection. We recommend choosing a scattering option that aligns best with the memories you have with your loved one.

Scatter Atop a Mountain Garden

Many people like the idea of scattering their loved one’s remains in a place they can visit from time to time. Ideally, it’s someplace registered for that purpose — and will be preserved over time. Scatter gardens are a wonderful option because they are filled with beauty and life. 

At Rest Ashured, we’ve actually created such a place in the Blue Ridge Mountains. 

Our scatter garden is a beautiful site with breathtaking views, abundant wildlife, and carefully-kept memorials. If you choose this service, you send the ashes to us through the mail. Then, we reverently scatter them on our mountaintop garden. Finally, we place an engraved memorial stone at the site and send a certificate of release. 

Although we keep the property closed to preserve the landscape, we open it twice a year for our days of celebration. During these days, we invite people to come and visit their loved one’s scattering sites. Visitors find it’s a meaningful time to pause, remember, and reflect.

Plant a Memorial Tree

Many people prefer the symbolism of planting a tree in memory of a loved one. Trees represent hope because of the way they grow from a small sapling into a beautiful tree. As they say, “Every gardener is an optimist.” 

As a resting place, a memorial tree celebrates a life well-lived by thriving in nature. Each year, as the tree grows taller, the memorial grows too. The tall trunk and long branches will point heavenward as a reminder of your loved one’s new home. 

We also provide this tree memorial service on our property. Similar to the scattering garden, we receive your loved one’s ashes through the mail. Then, we prepare a site for a new tree — scattering the ashes during the planting process. After planting, we place a stone at the base of the tree and send a certificate of release. 

The memorial trees are also available for visitation during the days of celebration. Our visitors enjoy seeing the tree grow from year to year.

Scatter Ashes at Sea

The ocean holds a special meaning for many people. Many people scatter ashes in the sea when the person has served in the Navy, Coast Guard, or Marines. Others choose it as a final resting place for fishermen. Many families like to choose a seaside close to a favorite vacation spot — where they spent quality time with their loved one. 

Burial at sea is legal as long as you abide by the EPA guidelines. This means you’ll need to be at least 3 nautical miles offshore and file appropriate paperwork. We recommend choosing a scattering service that is familiar with these guidelines and operates in compliance with the regulations. Then you are free to focus on your family and friends during the scattering ceremony. 

At Rest Ashured, we offer two types of burial at sea: attended and unattended. Attended ceremonies allow the family and friends to journey with the remains on a boat to the scattering location. Unattended ceremonies take place without the family or friends present.

During these ceremonies, the boat captain navigates to the appropriate location for scattering. At that spot, we respectfully scatter the remains. Afterward, the boat captain ensures that the proper paperwork is filed with the EPA. 

Honor Cremation Ashes with Rest Ashured

Our experiences with scattering ashes have shown us how much people need a personal way to say goodbye. Often, we hear that our clients plan their own ceremony, complete with readings and music to honor the life of their loved ones. They may hold it in a religious building, an informal venue, or even in a location that their loved one adored. After their special ceremony, they appreciate our simple and respectful process — where we scatter cremation ashes in our scattering garden in an unattended ceremony. From the actual memorial ceremony to the final goodbye when they send us their loved one’s ashes, our clients appreciate the personal touch offered by a memory garden.

Our advice? Select whatever works best for you from these cremation ashes ideas.

Get in Touch with Us

Our ash scattering services are a labor of love. We are honored by each scattering and help people say goodbye with dignity and respect. If you have any questions about our services, please get in touch with us. Call 434-534-4007 or email us at info@restashured.com.

Loss & Grief Ideas for Honoring Creation Ashes - RestAshured.com
Posted on

What to Do with Cremated Remains After A Loved One Has Passed

People Hugging

When a loved one passes away, events move quickly. You have a lot of decisions to make and it can feel overwhelming. If you have a will to reference, that makes it easier. If not, you have several critical decisions to make about how to put your loved one to rest. 

One comfort of cremation is that you can wait to decide what to do with your loved one’s remains. Then, when you’re ready, you can choose how to say goodbye.

Table of Contents

Is it Bad to Keep Cremated Ashes at Home?
Tips for Transferring Ashes to an Urn
How to Put Human Ashes to Rest?
Tips for Scattering Cremated Remains

Many people have questions about how to properly care for ashes after receiving them from the crematorium. Thankfully, you can move on your own timeline as you process the grief and celebrate the life of your loved one. In this article, we explain how to transfer ashes, how to properly store ashes, and how to scatter them when you’re ready. 

Is it bad to keep cremated ashes at home?

Many people wonder, “Is it bad to keep cremated ashes at home?” At the end of the day, it’s a personal choice. There are no U.S. laws prohibiting storage of human ashes in your home. Some people worry about religious consequences, or even paranormal activity when they choose to keep an urn with ashes in their house. In essence, the decision is rooted in your own beliefs about the afterlife and the constraints of your spiritual practices. 

When you receive ashes from a crematorium, they usually give them to you in a plastic bag. This is often placed inside a temporary container made of card stock or a similar temporary material. If you want to keep the ashes at home for a period of time, an urn gives you a reliable vessel to store and transport the remains

Tips for Transferring Ashes to an Urn

  1. Ensure the container is big enough before you transfer. Most adult’s ashes weigh between 4 to 8 lbs.
  2. You may need someone to help you with the transfer. They can hold the container to keep it steady. 
  3. Place your container on a flat, stable surface. Choose a surface you can easily wipe clean. 
  4. When you’re ready, cut a small hole in the corner of the bag. This will help you pour them softly into the new container. 
  5. If your container is narrow, you may need a funnel to facilitate the process.
  6. At the end, there may be larger elements to add. Carefully cut open the bag to make this easier to transfer. 

After you’re done, make sure the container is properly sealed. This helps prevent any spilling and creates a stable environment inside the container. 

Displays and Memorials

Once you have transferred the ashes, you can choose to display them or put them away. Common display areas include a fireplace mantle, a shelf or bookcase, or a prominent table in your living area. If you prefer to store them discreetly, a cupboard or wardrobe provides a safe area. Sometimes, people pick a spot in the home where the loved one used to spend time — such as a bedroom or office.

Many people choose to decorate the area with mementos, photographs and messages to the deceased. It can become a personal space for reflecting on the life of the person who has passed.

Of course, you should always consider the wishes of the deceased as expressed in their will. If they haven’t expressed their wishes, it can be harder to decide what to do. Many people keep ashes for a period of time after cremation — about one in five people choose to store ashes in their home

For those who choose to keep them, it’s often parents (about 54%). When asked why in a survey, many people (about 30%) explained they were not sure what their options would be to scatter or memorialize remains. 

Some people also find that they feel like their loved one is nearby during the mourning process when they keep the remains in their home. Then, when they’re ready, they look for an appropriate place to release the ashes and say a final goodbye. 

How to put human ashes to rest?

One key benefit of choosing to scatter cremated remains in a memorial? It creates a place for future generations to visit. In fact, that’s often the appeal of putting ashes to rest in a memorial or scattering garden. It takes the burden of keeping the ashes off of an individual and places them in a location where any loved one can visit.

Tips for Scattering Cremated Remains

If you choose to scatter your loved one’s remains, you follow the laws for scattering ashes. These are predominantly enforced and managed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In general, you cannot scatter in public or private areas without permission. Unless it is your own property, you must check the location beforehand to ensure you’re complying with local laws. 

One of the benefits of choosing a private scattering garden is that it has been prepared and registered for that purpose. So, you know that your loved one’s memorial will be preserved through time (unlike a public park or a residential area). 

After you choose a scattering location and get the appropriate permission, you should plan for the following:

  1. Decide if the scattering will be attended or unattended. 
  2. If you choose to attend the scattering, find out if you can say something during the memorial. Often, people like to recite a prayer, poem or Bible verse.
  3. If you choose to send your ashes for scattering, find out what the process is for verifying the scattering. 
  4. Plan for the fees. Most memorial sites have some fees for the scattering services and reserving the space. 
  5. After the scattering, you’ll need to mark the location. Memorial stones and memorial trees are popular choices.
  6. Find out if you can visit at a later date. Many people find comfort in this ritual.

If you have more questions about how to plan an Ash Scattering Ceremony, download this guide: https://restashured.com/comprehensive-guide-to-ash-scattering-ceremonies/

Send Cremated Remains to Rest Ashured

At Rest Ashured, we’re here to help you say goodbye. Our process follows five simple steps. 

First, you start by picking a scattering service. We offer a scattering garden, memory tree dedication and burials at sea. You can see all your options on our Services Page.

Next, we’ll send you a package. This contains all you need to send us ashes for scattering including boxes, labels and tape. It also contains simple instructions for how to prepare and post your package.

Then, you can ship the package to us using your local post office or favorite mail service. 

Once we receive your package, we scatter your loved one’s ashes as you specified. After the scattering, we send you a certificate of release. This marks the date and exact location of your scattering.

Ask Us Your Questions

Finally, you can rest assured knowing your loved one has been memorialized with the utmost care and dignity. 
We can’t remove the sadness of your loss, but we can remove the complications of laying a loved one to rest. We’ve tried to think of everything to relieve you of worries, and strive to make our process as simple as possible. If this sounds like something you would like to do, please get in touch with us. Call 434-534-4007 or email us at info@restashured.com.

Pin for What to Do with Cremated Remains?  - RestAshured.com
Posted on 1 Comment

How to Lay Someone to Rest in a Cremation Garden

Loved Ones with Grey Hair

While cremation has been around for thousands of years, modern cremation memorials are relatively new. Often, people don’t know how to lay someone to rest in a cremation garden. At Rest Ashured, we created a special space just for this type of event. 

In our garden, we scatter the ashes that people send to us with reverence and dignity. 

It’s a labor of love for us. We journey to our mountaintop property on beautiful days with your loved one’s ashes. From there, you can see the glory of nature with the rolling Blue Ridge mountains and rushing James River.

We gently release ashes over our garden. Then, we mark the location with a stone containing the individual’s name and life dates.

Table of Contents

Rest Ashured’s Cremation Garden
Selecting a Scattering Site
Sending Your Ashes
How do you scatter the ashes? How do I pick the date?
What do you say when you scatter ashes?
Do I get pictures of the ash scattering process?
What are the fees involved?
Visiting Your Loved One’s Memorial
Can we be present at the scattering?
Can I visit the memorial?
Prayers to Read at a Cremation Memorial
Poems to Read for an Ash Scattering Memorial
Bible Verses to Read When Visiting a Memorial

Most people have a lot of questions about the process and we’re happy to answer them.

Laying Someone to Rest in a Cremation Garden

When you have cremation ashes after a memorial service, you can wait any length of time before deciding to scatter them. Some people even keep them for years while they grieve. Once you’re ready, a scatter garden creates a wonderful place to release the ashes and say goodbye.

Rest Ashured’s Cremation Garden

Our garden creates a unique resting place that is both majestic and tranquil. It’s a private property in the Blue Ridge Mountains with views of the James River. On our property, we have a scatter garden where we scatter cremation ashes. The area is protected and contains markers with the name of each person scattered there. 

We were inspired to create this scatter garden by our own family’s experience with loss and grief. Over time, many people have laid the ashes of family and friends to rest in this garden memorial.

Selecting a Scattering Site  

If your loved one passed away without specifying a scattering site, a cremation garden provides a peaceful and meaningful scatter location. We properly registered our property for cremation ash scattering and have long-term plans in place to ensure the sanctity of the location. These are important points to note when you’re selecting a scattering site. It’s illegal to scatter human ash in most public places. Additionally, many private spaces won’t remain intact over time if they aren’t set aside as a memorial site.


Sending Your Ashes  

For those who choose to send their ashes to us, we help you through the process. First, we ask you to pick a scattering service. On our mountaintop, you can either choose to scatter the ashes over the garden or plant them with a memorial tree. 

Then, we’ll send you a package with all the necessary packing materials. It has the appropriate boxes, labels, tape, and simple shipping instructions. 

Then, you ship the package to us. You can drop it off at the local post office. (We also offer personal pickup for certain areas.)

How do you scatter the ashes? How do I pick the date?

Once we receive your package, we plan a time to scatter the ashes. Most of the time, we choose a day with mild weather. If you have selected a tree, there are seasonal considerations to ensure the tree takes root. 

Sometimes, people request scattering on a certain date. We can discuss that detail over the phone after you place your order.

What do you say when you scatter ashes?

In general, we send up a silent, respectful prayer as we release the ashes. Sometimes, people request a small statement, verse, or poem. If you have a special request, you can discuss this with us as we’re reviewing your order.

Can we be present at the scattering?

In general, our ash scatterings are unattended. This helps us keep the property pristine and undisturbed. However, we can discuss other options if you have a special request.

Do I get pictures of the ash scattering process?

Everyone who sends us ashes gets a certificate of release marking the date and exact location of the scattering. We also can send a picture of the marker or the memorial tree upon request.

What are the fees involved?

Our pricing varies depending on the service. A memorial stone in our scatter garden costs $275. A memory tree costs $425. We also offer options for scattering couples’ ashes and other special requests. You can see all of these by reviewing our services.

Visiting Your Loved One’s Memorial  

Although the ash scattering ceremony is unattended, we do open up our property twice a year to visitors. We call this our Day of Celebration.

Can I visit the memorial?

We hold one Day of Celebration during the spring and the fall. You’ll be notified by email prior to the event so you can plan to visit your loved one’s marker. 

On these days, we encourage friends and family members to visit, remember and reflect.

Prayers to Read at a Cremation Memorial

We’ve collected the following prayers to inspire your words when you visit your loved one’s scattering site.

A Funeral Prayer by Gregory Coles (Source)

And I pray that the worked you have accomplished in this remarkable life will grow deeper, wider, and stronger in the days to come, uninhabited by a we - RestAshured.comk opponent like death. A Funeral prayer by Gregory Coles

I cry for those of us left behind, for the lonely ones with hollows in our hearts. I ask You to comfort us, give peace, restore hope, and lavish us with love, family, and belonging. In the depths of loss, meet us with Yourself.

I cry for the legacy this loved one leaves, for the ways the world has been made different by their presence, for the memories that become both more beautiful and more painful on this side of death. And I pray that the work You have accomplished in this remarkable life will grow deeper, wider, and stronger in the days to come, uninhibited by a weak opponent like death. 

A Prayer of Comfort from Liturgy and Agenda (1921), p. 134 (Source

Comfort the survivors with your everlasting comfort and cheer them with the sweet hope of a blessed reunion in heaven. A Prayer of Comfort 1921  - RestAshured.com

O Lord God, Lord of life and death,
you turn man to dust and say,
“Return, O children of men,”
we give you thanks for all the mercies
which during his life you bestowed
on this our beloved brother, now fallen asleep.
Especially do we praise you
for having brought him to the knowledge
of your dear Son Jesus Christ.
Comfort the survivors
with your everlasting comfort,
and cheer them with the sweet hope
of a blessed reunion in heaven.
Grant to the lifeless body
rest in the bosom of the earth,
and hereafter, together with us all,
a joyful resurrection to life everlasting.
Teach us all to number our days
that we may apply our hearts to wisdom,
and finally be saved;
through Jesus Christ, your beloved Son,
our Lord and Savior. Amen.

A Prayer for Friends by Thomas à Kempis (Source)

Almighty and eternal God, have mercy on your servants our friends. A Prayer for Friends by Thomas A Kempis - RestAshured.com

Almighty and eternal God,
have mercy on your servants, our friends.
Keep them continually under your protection,
and direct them according to your gracious favor
in the way of eternal salvation.
May they desire whatever pleases you,
and with all their strength strive to do it.
As they trust in your mercy, O Lord,
graciously assist them with your heavenly help,
that they may always diligently serve you,
and be separated from you by no temptations;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. 

Poems to Read for an Ash Scattering Memorial

The following poems provide comfort and hope during the grieving process.

There Is No Night Without a Dawning by Helen Steiner Rice (Source)

There is no night without a dawning. No winter without a spring and beyond the dark horizon our hearts will once more sing for those who leave use for a while have only gone away out of a restless are worn world into a brighter day. There is No Night Without a Dawning by Helen Steiner Rice - RestAshured.com

There is no night without a dawning
No winter without a spring
And beyond the dark horizon
Our hearts will once more sing…
For those who leave us for a while
Have only gone away
Out of a restless, care worn world
Into a brighter day.

She Is Gone by David Harkins (Source)

you can turn your back on tomorrow and live yesterday, or you can be happy for tomorrow because of yesterday. She Gone by David Harkins

You can shed tears that she is gone,
or you can smile because she has lived.
You can close your eyes and pray that she’ll come back,
or you can open your eyes and see all she’s left.
Your heart can be empty because you can’t see her,
or you can be full of the love you shared.
You can turn your back on tomorrow and live yesterday,
or you can be happy for tomorrow because of yesterday.
You can remember her only that she is gone,
or you can cherish her memory and let it live on.
You can cry and close your mind,
be empty and turn your back.
Or you can do what she’d want:
smile, open your eyes, love and go on.”

Turn Again to Life by Mary Lee Hall (Source)

For my sake - turn again to life and smile. Turn Again to Life by Mary Lee Hail - RestAshured.com

If I should die and leave you here a while,
be not like others sore undone, who keep
long vigils by the silent dust, and weep.
For my sake – turn again to life and smile,
nerving thy heart and trembling hand to do
something to comfort weaker hearts than thine.
Complete these dear unfinished tasks of mine
and I, perchance may therein comfort you.

Bible Verses to Read When Visiting a Memorial

We appreciate the hope found in the following Bible verses.

Ecclesiastes 12:7 (NIV)

The spirit return to God who gave it. Ecclesates 12:7 (NIV) - RestAshured.com

“And the dust returns to the earth as it was, and the spirit returns to God who gave it.” 

Psalm 56:8 (NLT)

My heart is broken, my mind exhausted I cry out to you and hardly know what to ask, All I can do is tell you how I feel and ask you to keep track of all my sorrows, collect all my tears in your bottle, and record each on in your book as I poor them out to you. Psalm 56:9 (NIV) - RestAshured.com

“My heart is broken, my mind exhausted. I cry out to you and hardly know what to ask. All I can do is tell you how I feel and ask you to keep track of all my sorrows, collect all my tears in your bottle, and record each one in your book as I pour them out to you.” 

Exodus 22:27 (ESV)

And if he cries to me, I will hear, for I am compassionate. Exodus 22:37 (NIV) - RestAshured.com

“And if he cries to me, I will hear, for I am compassionate.” 

Psalm 31:9 (NIV)

Be merciful to me Lord, for I am in distress: my eyes grow weak with sorrow, my soul and body with grief. Psalm 31:9 (NIV) - RestAshured.com

“Be merciful to me, Lord, for I am in distress; my eyes grow weak with sorrow, my soul and body with grief.” 

Ask About Our Scatter Garden in Virginia

We provide reverent ash scattering options atop our beautiful mountain property in Virginia. Nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains, the property surrounding our garden remains very much in its natural state. We’ve cleared the landscape only enough to enhance the breathtaking views and maintain the scattering area. 

If you have questions about laying ashes to rest in our garden, we can help. Please get in touch with us. Call 434-534-4007 or email us at info@restashured.com.

Loss & Grieving. How to Lay Somone to Rest in a Creation Garden - RestAshured.com
Posted on Leave a comment

Five Ways Memorial Gardens Create a Peaceful Resting Place

Image of a bird visiting a memory garden

They say time heals. After a loved one has passed away, the length of mourning varies from person to person. People find comfort in many different moments and rituals from a formal funeral to a celebratory memorial service. If your loved one chose cremation, the timeline can move more slowly than traditional burial or interment. Many people choose to keep the ashes in an urn for a period of time. Then, you can release them whenever you’re ready. In these situations, memorial gardens create the ideal resting place because of their quiet, natural beauty.

“All is well.
Nothing is hurt; nothing is lost.
One brief moment and all will be as it was before.
How we shall laugh at the trouble of parting when we meet again!”

-Harry Scott-Holland, Death is Nothing at All (SOURCE)

Choosing a spot for the release is highly personal. If your loved one did not specify where they’d like to be scattered, or if they chose a place where scattering is not permitted, we suggest a memory garden as a peaceful resting place.

Table of Contents


Appreciate Natural Views
Use Nature’s Soundtrack
Attract Wildlife
Create Moments of Reflection
Offer Relief from Daily Commotion

Most memory gardens are private properties that have been registered for ash scattering. They are created with the long-term in mind. They’re set far away from busy, metropolitan areas or properties slated for development. 

These scattering gardens provide subtle landscaping. The changes only enhance the beauty of the surroundings and provide room for scattering location markers. 

Many of these ash scattering locations even allow you to visit semi-annually. This creates a beautiful tradition to honor the life of the person scattered in the garden. It allows you to grieve on your own timeline. 

You can scatter the ashes whenever you’re ready. Then, visit over the years to celebrate their life.

Memorial Gardens Create a Peaceful Resting Place

If you’re choosing between a traditional cemetery and a memory garden, you may enjoy the peaceful, natural setting of a cremation scattering garden.

1. Memory Gardens Appreciate Natural Views

Unlike traditional cemeteries or mausoleums, garden memorials for cremated ashes coexist within their natural settings. They don’t alter the natural views with large monuments, buildings, or other constructions. Instead, the best memory gardens create just enough structure to memorialize the area without destroying the natural beauty of the garden memorial.

At our Scatter Garden in the Blue Ridge Mountains, we’ve cleared only enough to enhance the breathtaking views. From our garden, you can see portions of the James River with a small waterfall. Every hour of the day brings a new phase of the sun. In the morning, the sunrise peeks out from behind clouds that nestle just across the river. Throughout the day, the rays shine through leaves and branches. In the evening, the colorful sunset splashes across the horizon until it sets behind the mountains. 

2. Memory Gardens Use Nature’s Soundtrack

In stark contrast to a mournful funeral dirge, or the clamor of cars on busy roads, memory gardens offer the twittering of birds. Soft, soothing sounds of rustling leaves will echo around these natural settings. Can you imagine visiting your loved one’s memorial and listening to the happy chatter of wildlife?

At Rest Ashured, we use native plants and trees to encourage the local wildlife to make their homes around our scatter garden. As a result, birds, squirrels, and insects provide a pleasant soundtrack to peaceful surroundings. When the breeze is still, you can even hear the soft rush of the river in the distance.

3. Memory Gardens Attract Joyful Wildlife

As we mentioned above, memory gardens encourage animals, birds, and insects to make their home around the area. This differs from cemeteries that often discourage wildlife from visiting the property. 

When you open up the landscape to this natural ecosystem, it comes alive with the joy of new life. You may see a bird’s nest full of eggs in the springtime or spot bees buzzing around the nearby flowers. We encourage these happy interactions because they add to the vibrant memorial garden cemetery.

4. Memory Gardens Create Moments of Reflection

When you visit a memory garden, the quiet landscape beckons. It’s ideal for moments of reflection — especially during occasions like our Days of Celebration. When family members and friends visit our location, they see the marker for where their loved one was scattered.

This creates a serene moment — not only to celebrate the person’s life but also, to soak in the comforting, natural surroundings.

When you are saying goodbye, these moments of reflection become a vital part of healing. You can enjoy the quiet and soak in nature while viewing your loved one’s marker.

5. Memory Gardens Offer Relief from Daily Commotion

While there is some cell phone service as our private, remote location — it’s mostly distraction-free. We encourage visitors to put their phones aside for our twice-annual days of celebration and take a break from the hustle and bustle of daily life. Visitors won’t hear the hum of traffic or the bleep of devices.

Buzzing cell phones are replaced by buzzing bees. Chattering squirrels drown out the memory of traffic jams. And rushing winds overwhelm the whirr of white noise.

These moments of relief become an important part of the grieving and eventual healing process. A memory garden creates the chance to break out from daily life. You can visit your loved one’s resting place without distraction.

Send Your Loved One to Rest in a Memory Garden

Memory gardens remain the ideal resting spot for anyone looking for a peaceful, remote place to put cremation ashes to rest. They’re usually solitary and natural — perfect for nature lovers. 

If you have questions about whether a scatter garden is right for you, please get in touch with us. We’re here to make the process as smooth as possible. Call 434-534-4007 or email us at info@restashured.com.

Pin for Five Ways Memory Gardens Create a Peaceful Resting Place